Disability and Community Support
Overview
  • Two-year diploma 
  • August entry date
  • Notre Dame Campus, Winnipeg
  • Workplace model 
  • Practicum, four placements (Residential, Employment/Day, Education, Final)
  • Joint degree option with University of Winnipeg
  • Credit transfer opportunities with Universities
  • Optional one-year certificate exit
  • RPL (Recognition of Prior Learning)
  • If you have a criminal record you may not be able to complete this program. If you are listed on a Child Abuse Registry or Adult Abuse Registry you will not be able to complete this program. See Program Progression Requirements for more info. 
  • International applicants please visit Academic Program, Dates and Fees for a listing of programs for international students, current availability and online application instructions

Description
In this program you will develop the knowledge, skills, and values required to support and enhance the development of persons with disabilities.  The program focuses on 'community', and students will provide support to persons with disabilities in schools, homes, employment, and leisure settings.  The program is offered as a workplace model which means that courses are offered in a block format and practica is integrated through out the term. It also means that regular applicants will learn alongside individuals who are currently working in the field. 

As a student, you will learn how to assist persons with disabilities to plan and achieve their personal goals and maintain their health and well-being. You will understand how to promote the development of inclusive communities and display competent, responsible, and professional behaviour and attitudes.  You will also have an opportunity to experience a variety of community settings through your fieldwork, or practicum, which makes up about one quarter of the program.

Prior to starting the program, you will be invited to attend a program information session. Although optional, it is highly recommended you attend. You may also be asked to participate in an individual interview.

Please view our PowerPoint Information Session Presentation


Admission Requirements

Regular Admission Requirements

  1. Grade 12
    • Submit proof of successful completion of or enrolment in Grade 12, including one credit of:
      • Grade 12 English
    • Due within 30 days of applying. However, if you apply within six weeks of the start date of the program, this item is due within 5 days of applying.
    • If you provide proof of enrolment, your official final grades indicating successful completion must be submitted by July 15 for fall enrolment or by the deadline specified in your admission letter
    • If you are required to complete an English language assessment, do not submit your transcripts until requested to do so.  See Regular Admission Requirement 2 for more information.
      and
  2. English Language Requirements (ELRs)
    • Have you successfully completed the equivalent of three years of full-time secondary (high school) education in Canada, the United States, or an ELR exempt country where English was the language of instruction? To view a list of ELR exempt countries click here.
      • If yes, you meet English language requirements. Submit your transcripts within 30 days of applying for verification purposes.
        or
      • If no, you are required to submit proof of meeting an English language requirements option within 30 days of applying.  For information click here.
        or
      • If you completed all of your education in Canada, the United States, or an ELR exempt country in English but did not complete three years of high school, submit your transcripts within 30 days of applying for review.
    • If you apply within six weeks of the start date of the program, this item is due within 5 days of applying.
    • Approved English language assessments and required levels for this program are:
      • Language Instruction for Newcomers to Canada (LINC) Certificate - exit Canadian Language Benchmark (CLB) levels from an English as a second language (ESL) program:
        Listening 8, Speaking 8, Reading 8, Writing 8
        or
      • International English Language Testing System (IELTS - Academic):
        Listening 6.5, Speaking 6.5, Reading 6.5, Writing 6.0
        or
      • Canadian Test of English for Scholars and Trainees (CanTEST):
        Listening 4.5,  Speaking 4.5,  Reading 4.5,  Writing 4.0
      • If completing an assessment, we strongly advise you complete it before submitting your application to ensure you meet language requirements and can submit your results within 30 days of applying.
      • Assessment results must be dated within two years of your application date.
      • After confirming you’ve met English language requirements through your assessment results, the College will send you an e-mail requesting submission of your transcripts.
        and
  3. Applicant Declaration for Check Documents Form
  4. Program Supplementary Information Forms
    • Submit completed program supplementary information forms
    • This item will be requested by the College at a later date
      and
  5. Letters of Reference
    • Submit two letters of reference
    • This item will be requested by the College at a later date
      and
  6. Academic Communication Assessment

Mature Student Admission Requirements
If you are 19 years of age or older and have been out of high school for a minimum of one year at time of application, and you do not meet the regular admission requirements, you may apply under the Mature Student admission requirements.

  1. Academic Requirement
    • Submit proof of successful completion of or enrolment in:
    • Due within 30 days of applying. However, if you apply within six weeks of the start date of the program, this item is due within 5 days of applying.
    • If you provide proof of enrolment, your official final grades indicating successful completion must be submitted by July 15 for fall enrolment or by the deadline specified in your admission letter
    • If you are required to complete an English language assessment, do not submit your transcripts until requested to do so.  See Regular Admission Requirement 2 for more information.
      and
  2. Meet Regular Admission Requirements 2 through 6

Program Progression Requirements
Upon acceptance into the program but prior to registration into your clinical/practicum placement(s) and progression to term 2, you will be required to submit the following:

  • Two Day Standard First Aid certificate
  • CPR Level C certificate
  • An original official Adult Criminal Record Check including Vulnerable Sector Search (ACRVS)
  • An original official Child Abuse Registry (CAR) Check (provincial)
  • An original official Adult Abuse Registry (AAR) Check (provincial)

If you have a criminal record you may not be able to complete the program.

If you are listed on a Child Abuse Registry or Adult Abuse Registry you will not be able to complete the program.

These requirements have expiration dates, and should be completed close to your program start date. Further information will be provided.

For more information, visit: http://www.rrc.mb.ca/files/File/catalogue/criminalrecordcheck.pdf

Who Should Enrol?

You should be a caring person, possess good communication skills, and have the desire and ability to work well with others. A high level of motivation and self-discipline, and good reading, study, and organizational skills are required. Flexible schedules are an asset as evening and weekend work may be required.

If you are an individual with two or more years of experience, currently working for agencies funded by Family Services, and you wish to strengthen your knowledge and commitment to supporting persons with disabilities, you may apply as a workplace student. There may be tuition supports available through Family Services for workplace students. 



Next Estimated Term 1 Start Date
(subject to change)

LOCATION START DATE  

Costs (estimates only; subject to change)
Program/Student Fees
Year 1 $4,014.00
Year 2 $4,014.00
Books and Supplies
Year 1 $900.00
Year 2 $700.00
Program/Student Fees (International)
Year 1 $13,866.00
Year 2 $13,866.00
 
Students may apply for financial assistance through the Manitoba Student Aid program. For general information on applying please call 204-945-6321 or 1-800-204-1685, or visit their website at www.manitobastudentaid.ca, which also includes an online application. For detailed information, please visit one of the RRC Student Service Centres or call 204-632-2327. Applicants requiring financial assistance should complete their student loan applications well in advance of the class start date.


Program Content
YEAR 1
TERM 1 COURSE NAME CREDIT HOURS
  COMM-1158 Interpersonal Communication 3
  DCSP-1001 Academic Communication 3
  DCSP-1012 Human Services: Values & Issues 3
  DCSP-1018 Supported Community Living 3
  DCSP-1030 Health & Personal Care 3
  DCSP-1087 Practicum-Residential 3
  DCSP-1281 Practicum-Employment/Day Service 3
  DCSP-2000 Understanding Complex Behaviour 3
  PRAC-1275 Practicum Seminar 1 2
  PSYC-1001 Introduction to Psychology 3
TERM 2 COURSE NAME CREDIT HOURS
  COMM-1158 Interpersonal Communication 3
  DCSP-1001 Academic Communication 3
  DCSP-1006 Applied Teaching & Learning 3
  DCSP-1007 Exploring Disabilities 3
  DCSP-1009 Employment & Disability 3
  DCSP-1014 Medications 3
  DCSP-1087 Practicum-Residential 3
  DCSP-1281 Practicum-Employment/Day Service 3
  DCSP-2004 Sexuality and Relationships 3
  DCSP-2276 Practicum Seminar 2 2
YEAR 2
TERM 3 COURSE NAME CREDIT HOURS
  DCSP-2001 Advocacy & Disability 3
  DCSP-2003 Applied Literacy Skills 3
  DCSP-2006 Practicum-Education 3
  DCSP-2007 Practicum Seminar 3 2
  DCSP-2008 Exploring Disabilities & Mental Health 3
  DCSP-2010 Exploring Community Through the Arts 3
  DCSP-2013 Inclusive Classroom Support 3
  DCSP-2026 Augmentative and Alternative Communication 3
  DCSP-3007 Supervision in Human Service Settings 3
TERM 4 COURSE NAME CREDIT HOURS
  DCSP-2011 Family & Disability 3
  DCSP-2016 Person Centred Planning 3
  DCSP-2017 Conceptual Frameworks in Disability Support 3
  DCSP-2190 Selected Topics in Disability 3
  DCSP-3000 Community Membership & Disability 3
  DCSP-3008 Practicum-Final 3
  DCSP-3041 Applied Communication Skills 3
  DCSP-3279 Practicum Seminar 4 2
 
Course Descriptions
COMM-1158 Interpersonal Communication
This course explores the complex styles of communication within various forms of relationships including discussion of self-image, perceptual differences, emotions and the impact of language. The course also addresses nonverbal communication and explores a variety of dynamics within relationships including effective listening, appropriate self-disclosure, defensiveness, assertiveness and managing conflict. Interpersonal communication with respect to cross-cultural, Indigenous and diverse perspectives are examined.
 
DCSP-1001 Academic Communication  

Students will develop the writing skills that will assist them to communicate their ideas in an academic setting (e.g. how to write a term paper), complete an incident report at work, and make oral presentations (e.g. public speaking skills) for both the work and college environment. For this last area, students will prepare and deliver a multimedia presentation on a self-selected topic.

 
DCSP-1006 Applied Teaching & Learning  
This course focuses on a variety of teaching strategies for individuals with disabilities. Students will prepare a focused, in-depth, meaningful learning plan for an individual with a disability. In order to do this, students will review and practice a variety of teaching techniques, set appropriate goals and objectives, promote natural incentives, judge when to teach or assist, judge how to teach or assist, prioritize tasks to be learned, and evaluate teaching effectiveness.
 
DCSP-1007 Exploring Disabilities  
This course provides the student with information about various disabling conditions and the implications for supporting individuals in their daily lives. Specifically, students will explore the etiology, diagnosis, prevalence, incidence, and care related to a variety of conditions. Students will review current definitions and describe contemporary prevention and support strategies.
 
DCSP-1009 Employment & Disability  
Students will describe the range of vocational options currently available to people with disabilities. Supported employment will be a major focus of study for the student. Students will explain the supported employment process, describe a marketing approach, compare perspectives on natural supports, and identify current trends in the field.
 
DCSP-1012 Human Services: Values & Issues  
Students will be introduced to the role that individual and societal values play in the treatment of individuals with an intellectual disability. Students will examine the historical evolution of service development and service delivery (segregation/integration, congregation/individualization, professional dominance/self-determination, client/citizen). Students will also examine the major issues that confront persons living with an intellectual disability in society today.
 
DCSP-1014 Medications  
In this course students will describe how to responsibly and sensitively assist people with disabilities in understanding the purposes and safe administration of various medications. Beyond just being able to competently give a medication, it is important that students identify different types of medication, purposes of various medications, and how they interact with each other.
 
DCSP-1018 Supported Community Living  
Students will explore the range of residential options currently available in the community. They will identify the skills necessary to assist people with disabilities to develop their own ideas of what they want their home to be. Students will describe the key features of self managed care, residential licensing procedures, and the role of the support personnel. Students will also study safety in the home, financial management, nutrition, and menu planning.
 
DCSP-1030 Health & Personal Care  

Students will be provided with a general overview of a healthy physical state as well as alterations from a healthy physical state. They will describe the knowledge and practical skills necessary to provide personal and health related care to individuals with disabling conditions. They will identify when to consult with appropriate health care professionals. They will also recognize and describe skills needed to support individuals with special medical issues and needs related to their specific disabling condition. Emphasis is placed on the provision of care while attending to such factors as privacy, safe practice, and individual preference and ability.

 
DCSP-1087 Practicum-Residential  
This course introduces students to a residential setting for individuals with disabilities. This experience will enable students to observe and practice the skills required as a residential support staff. This practicum involves working primarily during evenings and at least one weekend. This course is a mandatory course in the program. Students will spend 132 hours in a residential setting in either Semester 1 or Semester 2.
Prerequisites:
PRAC-1275
 
DCSP-1281 Practicum-Employment/Day Service  
This course introduces students to an alternative/employment related setting for individuals with disabilities. This experience will enable students to observe and practice the skills required as a support staff in an agency that assists individuals to work and live in the community. This practicum involves working primarily during the day. This course is a mandatory course in this program. Students will spend 152 hours in an employment day service setting in either Semester 1 or Semester 2.
Prerequisites:
PRAC-1275
 
DCSP-2000 Understanding Complex Behaviour  
The objective of the course is to assist students to describe the context of behavioural difficulties and to articulate the underlying conflicts that may lead to behaviour problems for individuals with disabilities. Students will discuss a variety of ways of supporting individuals with complex behavioural issues.
 
DCSP-2001 Advocacy & Disability
Students will be introduced to the need for strong advocacy on behalf of and by people with disabilities. They will review related human rights legislation and outline the principles of effective advocacy. Students will also identify strategies to encourage family, friends, and the individual to become involved in advocacy.
 
DCSP-2003 Applied Literacy Skills

Students will practice a variety of strategies that will assist people with disabilities to incorporate literacy into their everyday life experiences. Students will work directly with a learner to develop an individualized literacy plan.

 
DCSP-2004 Sexuality and Relationships  
Students will describe ways to facilitate healthy attitudes towards sexuality in relation to people with disabilities. They will utilize information to develop appropriate teaching strategies to help individuals learn about intimate relationships, and the prevention of sexual abuse and sexually transmitted diseases.
 
DCSP-2006 Practicum-Education

This course introduces students to a school setting for children or young adults with disabilities. This experience will enable students to observe and practice the skills required to work as an Educational Assistant in different types of school settings. This course is a mandatory course in the program. Students will spend 140 hours in an educational setting in Semester 3.

Prerequisites:
DCSP-2013 AND DCSP-2007
 
DCSP-2007 Practicum Seminar 3

In Practicum Seminar 3, students will examine the structure of services and the role of profit and not-for-profit agencies in the provision of support for persons with disabilities. Students will review personal and professional development areas relating to employment. They will also prepare for Practicum-Education.

 
DCSP-2008 Exploring Disabilities & Mental Health
Students will describe a variety of mental health, physical, and injury-related disabling conditions. Specifically, they will explore the etiology, diagnosis, prevalence, incidence, and care related to these disabling conditions. Students will review current definitions and describe contemporary prevention and treatment/support strategies.
Prerequisites:
DCSP-1007 AND DCSP-1030
 
DCSP-2010 Exploring Community Through the Arts

This course assists students in exploring the variety of creative opportunities for meaningful involvement in community life such as theatre, music, and art. Students will explore their own creative potential and consider strategies for assisting individuals to be included in artistic aspects of their homes and communities.

 
DCSP-2011 Family & Disability
Students will be provided with an orientation to family dynamics with the emphasis being placed on families who have a member with a disability. They will recognize the importance of respect for families and the need to support their involvement in the life of their family member.
 
DCSP-2013 Inclusive Classroom Support
Students will be provided with an overview of the educational system. They will review the evolution of special education services, the range of existing educational opportunities, work experience, and transition issues. Students will review strategies to support children and youth with modified and adapted curricula in inclusive school environments. They will also examine the role of the teaching assistant in the educational context.
 
DCSP-2016 Person Centred Planning
Students will be provided with a comprehensive overview of individual planning tools. They will review and apply PATHs, MAPs, IPPs and other current planning approaches used in the province. Students will incorporate current information on the importance of inclusion, empowerment, and individualization in the planning process.
 
DCSP-2017 Conceptual Frameworks in Disability Support
This course is designed to introduce the student to a number of issues that are current in the field. Students will review human rights/social legislation, de-institutionalization, abuse, family supports, service models, and advocacy.
 
DCSP-2026 Augmentative and Alternative Communication
Students will examine a range of augmentative communication systems for individuals with disabilities. They will explore and utilize symbol systems, computer-assisted technology, sign language and facilitated communication.
 
DCSP-2190 Selected Topics in Disability
This is a self-directed research course. It provides the opportunity for individual student research related to a particular area of interest. In this course, students will review current issues and topics related to disability. The focus may vary from year to year to reflect changes in thinking and research within the field.
Prerequisites:
DCSP-1001
 
DCSP-2276 Practicum Seminar 2  

Practicum Seminar 2 assists students in planning for Practicum-Residential and Practicum-Employment/Day Service. The principles of group dynamics and team work as well as how to plan for life-long personal and professional growth will be covered in this course.

 
DCSP-3000 Community Membership & Disability
Students will identify the competencies required to facilitate and support the meaningful inclusion of individuals with disabilities in the community. They will examine the concepts of integration and community, and learn a variety of strategies to facilitate successful integration.
 
DCSP-3007 Supervision in Human Service Settings
This course provides students with information about how to manage and supervise personnel in social service settings. Students will describe leadership roles and management styles, the importance of team-building, methods of conflict-management, strategies for staff appraisal and motivation, and ways of resolving performance problems.
 
DCSP-3008 Practicum-Final

This course enables students to have some choice in deciding where to complete their final practicum. Options may include residential, employment, or day service, and educational, advocacy, or community development. Students will be guided in making this decision by the practicum co-ordinator based on their career plan, as well as their academic record, general aptitude, and interest in a particular setting. The practicum co-ordinator reserves the right to make the final decision. This practicum may also be a paid practicum if the student has been offered employment during Semester 4 of the program. This course is a mandatory course in the program. Students will spend 173 hours at their site in Semester 4.

Prerequisites:
DCSP-3279
 
DCSP-3041 Applied Communication Skills
Expanding on concepts established in Interpersonal Communications A and B, students will study the qualities and practice the skills required to support individuals with personal issues and difficulties.
Prerequisites:
DCSP-1059 AND DCSP-2002
 
DCSP-3279 Practicum Seminar 4

Students will demonstrate employment preparation skills such as resume writing, career planning, and interview skills. Students will discuss practicum experiences, how knowledge and skill could be applied in the workplace, and plan for Practicum-Final.

 
PRAC-1275 Practicum Seminar 1  

Practicum Seminar 1 provides an orientation to practicum and assists students in planning for Practicum-Residential and Practicum-Employment/Day Service. Students will also demonstrate strategies related to time and stress management.

 
PSYC-1001 Introduction to Psychology  
This course is an introductory study of general and developmental psychology. It is designed for students in health care programs and as such, is aimed at practical application of social science knowledge in the helping relationships. It emphasizes fundamental principles of growth and development. Key concepts of personality motivation, emotional behaviour and methods of coping/adapting are included. Overall, the student is expected to gain insight into the roots of human behavior from both a physical and psychological perspective.
 

CO-OP/Practicum Information

Fieldwork or practicum make up about one quarter of the program. During these periods, you will be placed in service agencies where you will work with individuals with disabilities. The remainder of the program focuses on classroom course work. The courses and practica will provide you with skills to enable you to support individuals with disabilities.

Workplace students, that is, students with two or more years of experience working for services funded by Family Services, will be eligible to complete a Practica Challenge.

Transfer Credit Opportunities

Transferring credits to other post-secondary institutions

Athabasca University

  • Credits toward a Bachelor of Professional Arts, Human Services Major

University of Calgary

  • Graduates of this program will receive credit for the first two years of the U of C’s Bachelor of Community Rehabilitation (BCR) degree program.  However, the U of C may require additional courses be successfully completed prior to taking senior level courses.  In addition, a junior human science prerequisite course is required but can be completed after acceptance in the program. Please contact the U of C for more information.

University of Manitoba

  • Credits toward a Bachelor of Family Social Sciences

University of Victoria

  • Credits toward a Bachelor of Arts

University of Winnipeg

  • Credits toward a joint degree in Disability Studies

Thompson Rivers University

  • Credits toward a Bachelor of Health Science and Bachelor of General Studies
Recognition of Prior Learning
For information on RPL for the Disability and Community Support program, contact:
 
Cheryl Martens
Program Coordinator
Disability and Community Support Program
A109A-2055 Notre Dame Ave
Winnipeg, MB  R3H 0J9
204-632-2573
E-mail: cmartens@rrc.ca
Other Information

If you are interested in accessing courses online, the following are available in online format:

  • Academic Communication (blended in-class/online format)
  • Understanding Complex Behavior
  • Applied Teaching and Learning 
  • Employment and Disability
  • Applied Literacy Skills course (blended in-class/online format)

The Disability and Community Support program is offered in a Workplace Model.  Regular students will typically be in class for three days each week and on their practicum placements for 2 days each week.  Workplace students will be in class for two days per week and at their workplace for three days each week.  For workplace students, the term is extended past the regular term.  Classes are offered sequentially rather than concurrently. For most classes, regular and workplace students attend class together.

Joint Programs

University of Winnipeg:

A joint degree is available between this program and the Disability Studies program at the University of Winnipeg.

You may begin your studies at either institution. You are required to complete the two-year diploma in Disability and Community Support, for which you will receive 45 credit hours toward a Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science at the University of Winnipeg.

You must apply to both institutions and meet the entrance requirements of the RRC Disability and Community Support Program and the entrance requirements of the University of Winnipeg. 

For more information, visit https://www.uwinnipeg.ca/disability-studies/ or contact Michelle Owen at Michelle Owen <m.owen@uwinnipeg.ca>

University of Manitoba:

Students who have completed the Diploma in Disability and Community Support are eligible to receive 60 Transfer of Credit hours in the Bachelor Degree in Family Social Sciences.  This is a 120 hour degree program.  For more information please visit the Human Ecology website at: www.umanitoba.ca/human_ecology.

Employment Potential

Follow up research consistently shows that close to 100% of graduates find employment in the field or proceed to further education. Community options for people with disabilities have created a need for qualified personnel to work in a variety of settings including educational, residential, developmental, and employment or vocational services. Graduates are respected professionals who enjoy a very high employment rate. Previous graduates have found employment in community and government services in the following roles:

  • Direct support professionals
  • Residential support workers
  • Educational assistants in schools
  • Supported employment personnel
  • Vocational support workers
  • Individual support personnel
  • Respite workers
  • Rehabilitation workers
  • Family support workers
  • Program support and development personnel
  • Advocacy personnel

Our most recent statistics show an average salary of $29,172 six months after graduation. Prospects for advancement exist in related coordinator, supervisory, and management positions.

Student/Alumni Testimonial

Our Pledge
"We will look forward to the future,
We will remember the past;
We will be the creators of change.

We will look for possibility,
We will strive to persevere;
We will be the nourishment for growth.

We will eliminate barriers,
We will always trust in ourselves;
We will be the ones who dream big."

DREAM BIG, CLASS OF 2010

Contact Information

For general information about this program or how to apply, contact Enrolment Services at 204-632-2327.

For detailed program information, contact:

Cheryl Martens
Program Coordinator
Disability and Community Support Program
A109A - 2055 Notre Dame Ave
Winnipeg, MB  R3H 0J9
204-632-2573
E-mail:cmartens@rrc.ca