Indigenous Language
Overview
  • One-year (eight-month) certificate
  • September entry date
  • Notre Dame Campus, Winnipeg

Description
This program is designed to train you to work in the K-12 school system or in community-based programs with an emphasis on the Ojibwe language and cultural competencies such as reading, writing and speaking the Ojibwe language. This program will also increase your understanding of the social, cultural and historical significance of Indigenous peoples, in Canada and abroad.

You will learn the Anishinaabemowin (Ojibwe) Language, and obtain skills important to the revitalization of the Indigenous Language. You will learn in a variety of settings: classroom instruction, lab instruction, land-based learning and in a classroom or community-based practicum.

Admission Requirements

Preference will be given to people of Indigenous ancestry.

Regular Admission Requirements

  1. Grade 12
    • Submit proof of successful completion of or enrolment in Grade 12, including one credit of:
      • Grade 12 English
    • Due within 30 days of applying. However, if you apply within six weeks of the start date of the program, this item is due within 5 days of applying.
    • If you provide proof of enrolment, your official final grades indicating successful completion must be submitted by July 15 for fall enrolment or by the deadline specified in your admission letter.
    • If you completed your education outside of Canada or the United States, do not submit your international academic credentials until requested to do so.  See English Language Requirements (ELRs) for more information.
      and
  2. English Language Requirements (ELRs)
    • If you were educated outside of Canada or the United States, submit results of an English language proficiency assessment (ELPA) indicating you meet the following ELRs:
      • Language Instruction for Newcomers to Canada (LINC) Certificate - exit Canadian Language Benchmark (CLB) levels from Red River College's Academic English Prog for University and College Entrance program:
        Listening 8, Speaking 8, Reading 8, Writing 8
        or
      • Canadian Test of English for Scholars and Trainees (CanTEST):
        Listening 4.5,  Speaking 4.5,  Reading 4.5,  Writing 4.5
    • Due within 30 days of applying. However, if you apply within six weeks of the start date of the program, this item is due within 5 days of applying.
    • We strongly advise you successfully complete an English language proficiency assessment (ELPA) before submitting your application to ensure you can meet the 30 day deadline.
    • ELPAs must be dated within two years of your application date.
    • After confirming you meet ELRs, the College will send you a request to submit your international academic credentials for assessment.
    • For more information, visit www.rrc.ca/credentials

Mature Student Admission Requirements
If you are 19 years of age or older and have been out of high school for a minimum of one year at time of application, and you do not meet the regular admission requirements, you may apply under the Mature Student admission requirements.

Who Should Enrol?
This program is suited to those who wish to learn the Indigenous Language (Ojibwe), and who are prepared to take further language training to develop their skills in a variety of settings.

Regular attendance is mandatory. Punctuality and accountability are expected. In addition, you must be prepared to set aside time to complete assignments and projects outside of daily class hours.


Next Estimated Term 1 Start Date
(subject to change)

LOCATION START DATE  

Costs (estimates only; subject to change)
Program/Student Fees
Year 1 $4,817.00
Books and Supplies
Year 1 $1,400.00
Other Fees
Year 1 $255.00 1
1 Health and Dental Fees
 
Students may apply for financial assistance through the Manitoba Student Aid program. For general information on applying please call 204-945-6321 or 1-800-204-1685, or visit their website at www.manitobastudentaid.ca, which also includes an online application. For detailed information, please visit one of the RRC Student Service Centres or call 204-632-2327. Applicants requiring financial assistance should complete their student loan applications well in advance of the class start date.


Program Content
YEAR 1
TERM 1 COURSE NAME CREDIT HOURS
  ABOR-1055 Introduction Curriculum Development and Design 3
  ABOR-1070 Land-based Learning 1 3
  COMP-1250 Applied Technology 1 3
  LANG-1050 Anishinaabemowin Culture and Language 1 3
  LANG-1052 English and Ojibwe Communication Skills 1 3
TERM 2 COURSE NAME CREDIT HOURS
  COMP-2250 Applied Technology 2 3
  LANG-1051 Anishinaabemowin Culture and Language 2 3
  LANG-1053 Applied Indigenous Learning and Methodologies 1 3
  LANG-2052 English and Ojibwe Communication Skills 2 3
  WRKE-1025 Work Practicum 1 3
TERM 3 COURSE NAME CREDIT HOURS
  ABOR-2055 Developing Units, Lesson Plans and Class Materials Using Indigenous Language 3
  ABOR-2056 Learning Outcomes, Assessment and Rubrics 3
  LANG-2053 Applied Indigenous Learning and Methodologies 2 3
  LANG-3052 English and Ojibwe Communication Skills 3 3
  WRKE-2025 Work Practicum 2 3
 
Course Descriptions
ABOR-1055 Introduction Curriculum Development and Design
The Introduction Curriculum Development and Design course introduces participants to a range of theories and approaches to curriculum development and design, such as competency-based education and outcomes-based education. Although this course introduces such general concepts of curriculum theory and practice, the course focuses primarily upon the design and development of curriculum documents related to Ojibwe language instruction. The course also prompts reflection upon the importance of designing and developing positive learning environments.
 
ABOR-1070 Land-based Learning 1
The Fall land-based program offers experiential learning and land-based experiences in Anishinaabe teachings through pedagogy. First year students gain an opportunity to learn authentic life skills and ancestral teachings of the Anishinaabe Language and Culture while synthesizing knowledge, skills and abilities. The land-based immersion program offers students teachings from Ojibwe elders, cultural and Indigenous educators. The land-based philosophy is based on a "good way of life" through sacred teachings, ceremonies and songs. The seasonal Indigenous teachings have been passed down from generation to generation. Natural law and traditional teachings incorporate how to live off the land, care and protect Mother Earth. Students learn about the sacredness of Mother Earth, fauna and flora, and the elements - air, water, fire and earth. Students are immersed in the Ojibwe traditional and contemporary worldview of the fall season in holistic teachings and activities. Survival and social skills are embedded in the topics covered - e.g. fishing, hunting, and harvesting medicines and food. Students participate in the activities and seasonal protocols applicable to Fall.
 
ABOR-2055 Developing Units, Lesson Plans and Class Materials Using Indigenous Language
Participants will develop material related to their own work environment. In addition, participants will develop skills related to instructional design such as the development of plans for teaching and learning. This course highlights the importance of alignment; that is, the connection between course outcomes/goals, and delivery of instruction using Ojibwe. The course also prompts reflection upon the importance of designing and developing positive learning environments. Participants will use creative techniques and frameworks to help their students learn how to learn and how to think critically and creatively.
Prerequisites:
ABOR-1055
 
ABOR-2056 Learning Outcomes, Assessment and Rubrics
This course highlights the importance of alignment; that is, the connection between course learning outcomes/goals, delivery of instruction and the assessment and evaluation of learning with the use of rubrics and other assessment strategies. The course also provides the knowledge and skills to design and implement a comprehensive strategy for obtaining information that is used to inform learners of their progress and guide them to successful completion. The course enables the participants to plan, construct and use assessment instruments that are appropriate and ethical to the teaching of Ojibwe. The course also prompts reflection upon the importance of designing and developing positive learning environments.
Prerequisites:
ABOR-1055
 
COMP-1250 Applied Technology 1
This is a prerequisite foundation course for Applied Technology 2, in which students use a variety of technology in their professional and personal lives. This course provides opportunities to apply technology to conduct and analyze research, communicate with others, and explore Indigenous language software and applications. Students focus on culturally relevant, professional and targeted use of software and internet sources.
 
COMP-2250 Applied Technology 2
This course provides opportunities to apply technology to create culturally appropriate language materials. Using computer software, students will research, collect, analyze and create English and Indigenous language information that will be used in other courses and applications.
Prerequisites:
COMP-1250
 
LANG-1050 Anishinaabemowin Culture and Language 1
This course will focus on the knowledge and application of the basic grammatical structure of the Anishinaabemowin double vowel writing system utilizing Anishinaabe cultural perspectives and knowledge as the context and content. The students will be able to speak, read and write the Anishinaabemowin language at an introductory level.
 
LANG-1051 Anishinaabemowin Culture and Language 2
This course will continue to focus on language proficiency utilizing Anishinaabe cultural worldview and teachings as the context and content. The students will expand on their ability to speak, read and write the Anishinaabemowin language at an introductory to intermediate level using the Double Vowel writing system.
 
LANG-1052 English and Ojibwe Communication Skills 1
This introductory course delivers effective intrapersonal and interpersonal oral communication skills and reading and writing processes in English/Ojibwe. Students focus on personal and professional development of communication skills and a variety of academic writing in Ojibwe. Students use different contexts to accurately transmit oral and written messages and record written content using communication formats, media and technology. Oral presentations, reading and written assignments, portfolio and assessments focus on evaluating in Ojibwe.
 
LANG-1053 Applied Indigenous Learning and Methodologies 1
The course introduces Applied Teaching and Learning methodologies for language instruction. Students develop knowledge and skills to teach in a variety of educational environments. Students learn to apply both Indigenous and contemporary teaching and learning models using culturally appropriate resources, activities, and assessments in a variety of classroom and community contexts.
 
LANG-2052 English and Ojibwe Communication Skills 2
This intermediate course continues to focus on effective communication and written skills for students by using creative writing and presentation skills. Students strengthen their skills by discussing children's literature from a variety of sources. Oral presentations, written assignments and assessments focus on evaluating skills and abilities.
Prerequisites:
LANG-1052
 
LANG-2053 Applied Indigenous Learning and Methodologies 2
The course Applied Teaching and Learning 2 continues developing learning competencies for diverse Indigenous educational environments. Students continue to learn to apply both Indigenous and contemporary teaching and learning models using culturally appropriate resources, activities, and assessments in a variety of classroom and community contexts.
Prerequisites:
LANG-1053
 
LANG-3052 English and Ojibwe Communication Skills 3
This advanced course continues to focus on improving effective communication and written skills for students. Competencies are developed through integration of a variety of communication techniques and media. Students strengthen their skills by creating a variety of ways to share information by selecting the appropriate communication tools. Oral presentations, written assignments and assessments provide opportunities to integrate and evaluate their developing skills and abilities.
Prerequisites:
LANG-2052
 
WRKE-1025 Work Practicum 1
Contributing to community is one of the six values of Red River College. This practicum provides an opportunity for students to serve a school division in a non-paid capacity. Students are expected to synthesize the knowledge, skills, and competencies they are developing in the program to meet specific meaningful needs of the classroom/community partner. This practicum challenges students to apply real world critical thinking, self-assessment and reflection, communication in both languages, problem-solving, leadership and teamwork skills. Practicum outcomes are individualized for each student in partnership with the school or community partner to help define the student's role and responsibilities. The first Year 1 placement focuses on acquiring Anishinaabemon language in the context of culture and history to provide students with the opportunity to further develop knowledge, skills, and competencies needed for success in speaking, listening, reading and writing the Ojibwe language. Students also learn to apply both Indigenous and contemporary teaching and learning models using culturally appropriate resources, activities, and assessments in a variety of classroom and community contexts. The substantial hours in the workplace provide opportunities to improve both languages in a variety of contexts.
 
WRKE-2025 Work Practicum 2
Contributing to community is one of the six values of Red River College. This practicum provides an opportunity for students to serve a school division in a non-paid capacity. Students are expected to synthesize the knowledge, skills, and competencies they are developing in the program to meet specific meaningful needs of the classroom/community partner. This practicum challenges students to apply real world critical thinking, self-assessment and reflection, communication in both languages, problem-solving, leadership and teamwork skills. Practicum outcomes are individualized for each student in partnership with the school or community partner to help define the student's role and responsibilities. The first Year 1 placement focuses on acquiring Anishinaabemon language in the context of culture and history to provide students with the opportunity to further develop knowledge, skills, and competencies needed for success in speaking, listening, reading and writing the Ojibwe language. Students also learn to apply both Indigenous and contemporary teaching and learning models using culturally appropriate resources, activities, and assessments in a variety of classroom and community contexts. The substantial hours in the workplace provide opportunities to improve both languages in a variety of contexts.
 

Objectives/Learning Outcomes
Students who complete the program will acquire:
  •       The ability to read, write and speak in the English and Indigenous Language
  •       The ability to develop Indigenous Language programming with learning outcomes and assessments with rubrics
  •       Multimedia and desktop publishing skills to support Indigenous Language instruction
  •       Work experience in a variety of settings
Recognition of Prior Learning
Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL) is a process which documents and compares an individual's prior learning gained from prior education, work and life experiences and personal study to the learning outcomes in College courses/programs. For more information, please visit www.rrc.ca/rpl.
Other Information

Financial Assistance

First Nation students are advised to apply for financial assistance by contacting their Band Office, Tribal Council, or local management board.

Metis students are advised to contact their regional office of the Manitoba Metis Federation or Metis local management board.

Inuit students are advised to contact:
Government of the Northwest Territories
Northwest Territories Education
Culture and Employment
Manager of Student Services
Yellowknife, NWT  X1A 2L9
1-800-661-0793
Fax 1-800-661-0893

Nunavut students are advised to contact:
Financial Assistance for Nunavut Students
Nunavut Department of Education
Adult Learning and Post Secondary Services
Box 390
Arviat, Nunavut
X0C 0E0
1-877-860-0680
Fax: 1-877-860-0167
E-mail: FANS@gov.nu.ca

Inuit students from Nunavut are advised to apply for financial assistance from their Band Office.

Inuit students residing in Manitoba can try contacting the Education Directorate at Indian and Northern Affairs Canada, phone 204-983-2338.

Applicants who receive, or who are eligible to receive City of Winnipeg or Province of Manitoba Social Assistance are advised to contact their local office.

Applicants who receive, or who are eligible to receive Employment Insurance benefits are advised to contact their nearest Employment Centre.

Employment Potential
Graduates may find employment as educators, or work in legal, medical, or Aboriginal organizations or agencies. Other graduates have pursued university programs in the areas of arts and education. 
Contact Information
For further information, contact:

Indigenous Liaison/Advisors

Monica Morin 204.631.3361

Jaime Richard 204.632.2483

Aspiring Student Manager

Frank Parkes 204.632.2534

www.rrc.ca/indigenoussupport